Over the past eight years, Katherine Emely Gomez’s work has been selected for presentations locally and across several states; from New York to Colorado in over 15 art gallery exhibitions, including a solo show at Chashama in Harlem, NY. Gomez has participated in the Openings NY Artist Residency program for two summers and is a recipient of a Chashama Artist Grant and En Foco PDI honorarium.

Gómez is a contemporary artist who seeks to create a different view of self-portraiture and dreamlike imagery using photography and oil paints. She explores how environment, culture, life events, grief, love, and imagination are as important to one’s own identity as a given name at birth. Her portraits themselves embody self-transformations, exploration and reflection inspired by twin loss. As an identical twinless twin, her image has come to represent three entities: her sister, her twin hood, and herself.

Her installations are designed to transport the viewers into understanding the perception of losing your “Twinship”. An immersive experience using symbolic objects, mirrors and furniture. Her latest artworks portray symbolism of strength and spiritual essence while using a combination of expressionistic painting and photographic realism. View artworks page for more in depth descriptions per series.

She holds a BFA and MFA from the City University of New York, Lehman College in The Bronx. Her artworks was recently exhibited at Local Project Art Space in Long Island City, Queens, the Maritime Garage Gallery in South Norwalk, CT, Riverfront Art Gallery in Yonkers, Center for Fine Arts Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado. She has curated group exhibitions at the Living Gallery in Brooklyn and St. Paul the Apostle, Upper West Side, NY. Her story and artworks were broadcasted at NY1 Noticias, News12 and written by Hartford Courant, Scene Magazine, El Diario Newspaper and Harlem News Group. 


“Through the use of her photography, Katherine Emely Gómez, was able to convey the light and pain of her deepest sentiments and memories into symbolic representations of something only truly known to the artist herself. Although this may be a difficult task, Gómez does a beautiful job in executing something included in her artist statement- “Making the invisible visible.”

 – Scene Magazine